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Past Trials

Intubation

CHECK-Up Trial: Up

For patients being placed on a breathing machine, a breathing tube must be placed in the mouth.  During placement of a breathing tube, low oxygen levels may occur.  Whether placing a breathing tube while the patient’s head and shoulders were elevated (“ramped position”) could prevent low oxygen levels compared to placement of a breathing tube…

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PreVent Trial

Low oxygen level is the most common complication that arises when a critically ill patient is being placed on a breathing machine. Whether providing oxygen and ventilation with a bag-mask device prior to placement of a breathing tube prevents low oxygen levels had been unknown.  Among 401 patients in 7 intensive care units, the PreVent…

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FELLOW Trial: VL/DL

To support seriously ill patients with a breathing machine, doctors must place a breathing tube.  One-in-five times doctors cannot place the breathing tube on the first try.  When the breathing tube cannot be placed on the first try, the risks to the patient for low oxygen levels or blood pressure are higher.  Two types of…

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FELLOW Trial: AO

Low oxygen levels is the most common complication that arises when a critically ill patient is being placed on a breathing machine. Whether providing oxygen with a small tube below the nose (“nasal cannula”) during the placement of a breathing tube prevents low oxygen levels had been unknown.  Among 150 patients receiving a breathing tube…

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Proper Trial

When a patient requiring a breathing machine is ready to be disconnected from that machine, providing additional oxygen support using a mask over the patient’s mouth (called “non-invasive ventilation”) or a large tube under their nose (called “high flow nasal cannula”) had been reported to decrease the likelihood of the patient needing to be put…

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ETTS

For patients on a breathing machine, doctors may secure the breathing tube in place using either adhesive tape or an endotracheal tube fastener.  The ETTS Trial compared the securement technique of adhesive tape versus an endotracheal tube fastener for patients in the medical intensive care unit expected to require a breathing machine for more than…

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Non-invasive respiratory support

ICU Survivor Clinic Trial

People who survive critical illness frequently suffer from problems with their strength, thinking, and mental health for months after returning home from the hospital.  To test whether a structured program with specific follow-up visits and resources could prevent the need to be readmitted to the hospital for patients who had previously been treated for critical…

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CHECK-Up Trial: Checklist

For patients being placed on a breathing machine, a breathing tube must be placed in the mouth.  During placement of a breathing tube, low oxygen levels and low blood pressure may occur.  Whether using a checklist prior to placing a breathing tube helps prevent these complications is unknown.  Among 262 patients being placed on a…

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Fluid Management

BALANCE Trial

Patients being treated for sepsis, a serious infection that can lower blood pressure, are often treated with fluids through an IV. Previous studies have shown that a positive fluid balance, or more fluids taken in than out, may be connected to problems with kidney and lung function. The BALANCE pilot trial enrolled 30 patients; 15…

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PREPAREII Trial

Patients in the intensive care unit who require treatment with a breathing machine may develop serious problems with blood pressure or heart rhythm while the breathing tube is being placed.  To learn whether problems with blood pressure or heart rhythms could be prevented by giving patients fluid through an IV, we led a research study…

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SMART Trial

Patients in the intensive care unit frequently receive IV fluid.  For more than 100 years, two basic types of IV fluid have been available: saline (which contains more chloride than human blood) and balanced crystalloids (which contains about the same amount of chloride as human blood).  No large trials had previously evaluated which fluid resulted…

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SALT-ED Trial

Patients in the emergency department are frequently given fluids through an IV as a treatment for a wide variety of injuries and medical complications. Historically, the most common fluid given to patients had been saline.  Saline contains a higher concentration of chloride than that of human blood, which could have negative effects on patients’ kidneys…

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SALT Trial

Patients in the intensive care unit frequently receive IV fluid.  Two basic types of IV fluid exist: saline (which contains more chloride than human blood) and balanced crystalloids (which contains about the same amount of chloride as human blood).  No large trials had previously evaluated which fluid resulted in the best outcomes for patients.  In…

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